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Author: vuyiswa-xekatwane

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On the 9th of December 2016, Umuzi Academy hosted a year end exhibition titled Lost In the World.

Curated by american based photographer Moyo Oyelola and Umuzi creative directors Nthabiseng Lethoko and Odendaal Esterhuyse, Umuzi recruits created work that reflected the themes of spiritual deprivation, gentrification and addiction.

From conceptualising, producing and having their work printed and displayed, the exhibition was the first time many of the recruits had organised an exhibition, something they will surely be accustomed to in the future.

Boasting an edible social experiment and selfie station the multimedia exhibition was interactive and encouraged audience members to make their own impressions on some of the artwork.

 

 

We spoke to one of the participating multimedia recruits, Jabulile Hlanze’s whose artwork revolved around the theme of nature as a conduit of spirituality, she spoke to us about her creative process and her experience partaking in the exhibition.

What theme were you doing and why did it resonate with you? 

The overall exhibition was titled “Lost In The World”, which explored the idea of a lack of direction we all may experience. Under the theme ‘Spirituality’ – I explored the way I take in and experience the concept of spirituality. It resonated with me because spiritual presence is something that is important to me.

Rooted In SpiritRooted In SpiritRooted In SpiritCan you explain your piece to us, the name, your intentions with it and what you had hoped people would get from it.

My piece was titled Rooted in Spirit. Not only do trees provide oxygen and shade but they bring comfort as well. Whenever I need to connect and balance my energy, witnessing a person (or beings) and being under a tree to connect with self helps to rejuvenate my soul, it allows me a moment to engage with the present moment – even in the simplest of surroundings.

In the madness of the everyday, spirituality tends to be the last thought that is fully acknowledged so I hoped people would be able to take a moment and absorb the different textures, conclude what would resonate with them within the piece and grant a moment to appreciate the spiritual calmness that trees bring.

What was your creative process in putting together the piece. 

Looking at the space that was offered, I wanted to create a mixed media art piece (which is something I’ve never done except in print exhibitions) that would offer the printed image room to expand into a tangible experience. Entering the space the viewer would walk on the African mat ‘incansi’ which lead to the printed art piece framed by actual grass cuttings which were placed inside a circle of different color candles that were lit. Hanging above the grass was, ‘isimbhatho, a traditional church regalia used and worn when prayer.

How was your experience of the whole exhibition?

It was interesting to note and experience the way other people express their spirituality and addictions. It was also interesting to consciously note the different expressions of gentrification and areas going through such transactions.

The thought-provoking exhibition was rounded off with tunes, dance moves and laughter as current recruits, alumni and industry friends bid the year farewell.

Lerato Laughing

Lwando dancing

Being young, black and bred in a city like Johannesburg makes for interesting discourse in the conversation of heritage. What does culture and heritage mean when your “homeland” is a dusty township as opposed to some vast plot in an idyllic village? What are your claims to lineage and ethnicity when your first language is not indigenous and your expressions are void of the ambiguity and poetry of  our mother tongues?

If heritage and culture is the result of social and demographic influence, what traditions and languages are we creating in a city such as Jozi?  Having being born and bred in Johannesburg , attended multiracial schools and being encouraged to speak English for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week, what claim can I lay to my heritage and culture? The nuances and mannerisms that are a result of living in the melting pot that is townships and urban spaces, what do we call those? How long are the ways of people in urban areas going to be reduced to sub and popular culture?

For Heritage Month we’re doing things a little bit differently ,we’re looking at our bodies, the spaces we occupy and the way we express ourselves as a culture and future reference for heritage. We’re looking at music, fashion, colloquialisms and urban lifestyle as valid culture.  Join us as we celebrate the quirk and complexity of being young, black and what culture means in an urban context.

subcultures image (1)

 

 

Celebrating a body that is often othered, Nomathemba Mkhize illustrates the plus size body in her series Boomba Queen. Seeking also to embrace herself as a “boomba”, Noma is challenging the everyday stereotypes that big women aren’t good looking, sexy, smart, or even important. More than anything its about self love and celebrating the marvel and maginificence that is  the “boombas” of the world.
sexxy babe
“We are the outcasts
The misfits. The miser’s of the all famous status quo
The hidden and under praised.
The overly meatiness, I’m not sure what this means. Please help?
Izidudla zendawo, who try to shine under their own stage
because the public is “too small” for us!
We are the ones they never try to compete with, because
they see no competition.
Of course, with all this thickness, one shouldn’t try and compete
What people do not understand, is that our thunder thighs,
make pants look good.
With our curves, derriere and butts… we make naked feel good!”
Plus size me
slay
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